December 10, 2016

Lukboc (or "Liubo") was the most popular board game invented at around 500 B.C. in ancient China. Based on archaeological dating, the earliest copy of the game had appeared around the end of the Eastern Zhou dynasty. The game had reached its immense popularity during the Han dynasty (220 B.C.-280 A.D.) where all levels of the society including aristocrats, officials, merchants, scholars, and peasa...

December 9, 2016

The popularity of any game will depend heavily on a group of instigators and promoters. The aristocrats and elites were the main driving force behind the success of Lukboc. With simple to learn rules, easy to carry parts, and able to gamble with money, Lukboc was quickly becoming their game of choice to show off their wealth. Some had their polyhedral bone dice decorated with colorful gemstones, p...

December 8, 2016

As a common misconception, Lukboc is nothing like Weiqi (Go), Xiangqi (Chinese chess) or Mahjong. The oldest Weiqi game board discovered today dates back to about 206 B.C. of the late Warring States period. The oldest scriptures describing the rules of Xiangqi and the earliest form of Mahjong named "Yapei" have only appeared during the Song dynasty (960 to 1279 A.D.). Lukboc has its deep root in T...

December 7, 2016

Based solely on complex mathematical combinatorics, probability and randomness, Mahjong is continuing to be one of the most popular board game in China today. Both the game of Mahjong and Lukboc has shared many resemblances. The placement of tiles is uni-directional and both games required their players to start with a fixed quantity of gambling tokens (counting sticks). Both games require the use...